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Donaghmore Parish & Castlefin, Co. Donegal, Ireland in 1837
Lewis' Topographical Dictionary of Ireland

Transcribed, Compiled and Submitted by
Len Swindley, Melbourne, Australia
len_swindley[at]hotmail.com

DONAGHMORE, a parish, in the barony of RAPHOE, county of DONEGAL, and province of ULSTER; containing, with the post-town of Castlefin, 13,257 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Finn, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 46,378 statute acres, of which 45,630 are applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £14,331 per annum, and 330 are water. More than one-third is mountainous and uninhabited; and, with the exception of a small portion of woodland, roads, and water, the remainder is good arable and pasture land. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Derry, and in the patronage of the Lighten family. The tithes amount, to £1440. The glebe-house is a comfortable residence; the glebe com- prises 750 acres. The church, situated near Castlefin, is a plain old edifice, towards the repairs of which the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have recently granted £273: there is also a chapel of ease opened for divine service in 1833. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; there are three chapels, situated respectively at Crossroads, Castlefin, and Sessaghoneel (sic). The Presbyterians have three places of worship, two in connection with the Synod of Ulster, namely, one at Donaghmore of the first class, and the other at Raws; and one belonging to the Seceding Synod. There are eight schools, in which about 300 boys and 250 girls are instructed; and nine pay schools, in which are 620 boys and 220 girls, and 10 Sunday schools, with six classes of adults established by one of the curates, who instructs 180 males and 80 females.

CASTLEFINN, a post-town, in the parish of DONAGHMORE, barony of RAPHOE, county of DONEGAL, and province of ULSTER, 4½ miles (West by South) from Lifford, and 111¾ (North West. by North) from Dublin: the population is returned with the parish. This place, which was anciently called Castle-Fynyn, belonged about the close of Elizabeth’s reign to Sir Neill Garbh O’Donnell. It is situated on the river Finn, which is navigable to the Foyle for vessels of 14 tons’ burden, and is on the road from Strabane to Stranorlar; it consists of a single street. Here is a R. C. chapel.