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Co. Tyrone Deaths 1861-1870


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Co. Tyrone Deaths 1861-1870
Deaths Reported in the Irish American Weekly and Irish Citizen Newspapers of New York City, NY, USA

Transcribed & Compiled by Ann Donnelly
hooksett416[at]aol.com



Date: Saturday, January 9, 1858

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

Jan 2, at 81 West 19th street, John McCartney, aged 43 years, a native of Cookstown, county Tyrone, Ireland.

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Date: Saturday, January 23, 1858

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY Page: 3

Dec. 5, at the Hill, Strabane, county Tyrone, aged 80 years. J. MacCullagh, Esq., father of the lamented Professor MacCullagh.

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Date: Saturday, January 30, 1858

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 2

Jan. 1 in Drogheda, Annie Francis, eldest daughter of the Rev. William Smith, rector of Baldebey, county Tyrone.

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Date: Saturday, January 15, 1859

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY Page: 3

Jan. 9, at her residence, 146 Leonard street, after a short illness, in the 42d year of her age, Mary, wife of John Mooney, a native of Dungannon, county Tyrone, Ireland.

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Date: Saturday, May 28, 1859

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

April 26, at Favour Royal, in the 68th year of his age, John Corry Moutray, 66 years a grand juror of the county Tyrone.

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Date: Saturday, October 15, 1859

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

At 158 Avenue A., after a short and painful illness, Margaret, the beloved wife of James Aikens, a native of the Parish of Clogher, county Tyrone, Ireland.

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Date: Saturday, March 9, 1861

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 4

Died, On Friday, February 8, after a long and painful illness, which she bore with the fortitude of which the true Christian alone is capable, Sarah, the beloved wife of Hugh Trainor, a native of Dromore, county Tyrone, Ireland, in the 46th year of her age.

Having been nurtured, so to speak, amid the busy walks of life, she acquired, at an early age, that profound knowledge of human nature, by means of which she was enabled to distinguish the really virtuous from the cloaked imitator, and was thereby enabled to point out to the many who sought her advice their proper spheres, and direct them in their course through life. A devoted and loving wife, a fond mother, a true and lasting friend, she thought no favor too great for the needy, no sympathy too deep for the afflicted, no kindness too much for the deserving. In her the p=oppressed have lost a worthy confident, the sick a tender and careful nurse, her family a member whose virtues may be imitated, whose example may be followed, but for whom a substitute never can be found. Having been, while living, a devoted member of the Catholic Church, she was permitted at death to receive all the consolations which that Church is so admirably calculated to impart at that awful moment.

Calm was the sky on that fair day,

And bright all nature round.

But calmer was the spirit that lay

Awaiting the Redeemer’s voice to sound.

At last that wished for sound is hear –

Mortal thy work is done,

And now to receive thine own reward,

Come beauteous spirit ! Come !

I.Q.

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Date: Saturday, May 11, 1861

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

April 1, at Newtownbutler, at the residence of his son, the Rev. Patrick Traynor, formerly of Glennan, county Tyrone, at the advanced age of 98 years.

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Date: Saturday, July 20, 1861

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

June 27, at Fardross, county Tyrone, Cecilia, wife of Ambrose Upton Gledstanes, Esq.

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Date: Saturday, August 3, 1861

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 4

June 29, at 8 Synge street, Dublin, James O’Neill, of Stewartstown, county Tyrone, aged 72 years.

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Date: Saturday, January 18, 1862

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 2

The late Captain Hugh McQuaide

In recording the demise of the above officer, which took place in Richmond, Va. on the 26th ult., it is our painful duty to announce a fact which, though not altogether unexpected, must cause a pang of sincere sorrow to every one who enjoyed the friendship or acquaintance of the lamented deceased. It will be in the recollection of our readers that, some weeks ago, we published a letter from one of the Sisters of Charity in attendance upon the military hospital at Richmond, in which it was stated that the amputation of his leg, which Captain McQuaide had undergone, had proved ineffectual, and that a second amputation had become necessary, though the physicians had but little hope of thereby preserving the patient’s life. The fortitude and resignation with which Captain McQuaide underwent so terrific an ordeal, showed not only the indomitable spirit and courage of the soldier, but that his soul was fortified by the hope of the true Christian and strengthened by that entire submission to the Divine will which alone can deprive the direst calamity of its sting.

The annexed latter from Lieut Dickinson, U. S. 3d Infantry, to the brother of the deceased, conveys in fitting language the tidings of the decease of Captain McQuaide, and the respect and esteem in which he was held by his brother officers –

Military Prison, Richmond Va

December 27, 1861

John McQuaide, Esq, Yorkville, N. Y.:

Sir – It is my painful duty to inform you of the death, yesterday evening, about five o’clock, of your brother, Captain Hugh McQuaide, 38th New York Volunteers. His funeral was attended this afternoon by Drs. Revere of Mass and Fletcher, of Indiana, Captains Hunt, 1st Kentucky, and Margoe, 1st Pennsylvania, Lieuts Dickinson, 2d Infantry, U.S.A., Wallace and McPherson, 42d (Tammany), New York, together with Mr. Higgins (a citizen of Richmond), to which and to Mrs. Higgins, we all feel much indebted for attentions and kindness to your gallant and unfortunate brother.

The services of the Roman Catholic Church were performed by Father R. H. Andrews, who has attended during Captain McQuaide’s illness and who desires me say that he will at once perform High Mass; and that nothing shall be omitted that may be calculated to mitigate in any degree this severe blow to you all. Every requirement of his faith shall be strictly attended to. His body has been placed in the receiving vault of the Catholic Cemetery here. It is [illegible] and covered by a black walnut coffin so as to be readily identified by his friends.

I have known your brother for several years, when he was 1st Sergeant of Co. F., U. S. Mounted Rifles. My regiment and the Rifles were for many years serving in New Mexico, and I must be allowed to say that a more efficient, active, promptly, energetic and zealous soldier I never knew. After knowing him well upon the wild Western frontiers, we were brought together again, both wounded on July 21, at Manassas, in the same ward at the General Hospital here. And I can testify to the brave spirit and patient endurance he maintained during all his suffering, prolonged now to over five months.

From hearing him frequently speak of his relatives at home, and knowing how anxious you must be, I have seized the earliest [illegible] to communicate with you.

Lest you may entertain erroneous impressions concerning him I will relieve any doubt as to his treatment. I assure you that he has met every attention and kindness, both medical and otherwise, that could possibly be extended to him. You may possibly feel unsatisfied that he had not been exchanged or paroled, but there has never been a moment since he was wounded when he could have been sent home. Any moment of him, for even a short distance, would have, undoubtedly, proved fatal. His wound had improved considerably, but a severe chronic diarrhea, which had resisted all attempts at cure for over three months, had completely prostrated him, and he sank under it at last.

Please remember me to Mr. Quick, who came out last summer to see your brother.

With much respect, and with heartfelt sympathy for yourself and the other members of your saddened family,

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

W Dickinson, 1st Lieut.,

U.S.3d Infantry

Captain Hugh McQuaide was a native of the County Tyrone, Ireland. He was born on the 1st of January, 1832, and came to this country with his parents when only 18 months old. At the age of nineteen he entered the United States Army, in Philadelphia, and served ten years in the Mounted Rifles, under Colonel (now General) Andrew Porter, being actively engaged most of the time in Texas and New Mexico. He quickly rose to be 1st Sergeant of “F” Co. The testimonials he received during this time, from his officers, were of the most flattering character. In General Orders No. 11, issued from the Headquarters of the army at New York, November 23, 1860, he is honorably mentioned for having, with a small scouting party, consisting of a Corporal and fourteen privates of his regiment, pursued into the desert region known as the “Jornado,” a numerous band of Indians, from whom he recaptured between fifteen and sixteen hundred sheep which they had carried off. After stating the particulars of the expedition, which was a most trying and dangerous one, the General Orders conclude –

Sergeant McQuaide, on this occasion, fully sustained a high character gained by him on previous occasions.”

Col. Porter thus speaks of him in his discharge at the end of his second term of service –

Sergeant McQuaide has served in my Company for ten years, and a better soldier or man I have yet to meet. He is brave, honest, sober, and intelligent, and is, in every way, entitled to respect and consideration.”

After his discharge from service, he was appointed to the rank of 2d Lieutenant, and obtained leave of absence to visit his friends in New York. While at home the present unhappy rebellion broke out, and the first call for Volunteers was made upon the loyal States. Capt. McQuaide immediately set about raising Co F., of the Second Scott Life Guard, 38th N. Y. V., and at his own expense (something like $400) perfected the organization. His subsequent history is known to our readers. At the disastrous engagement of Bull Run, in which his regiment fought bravely, he was severely wounded in the left leg, and was taken as a prisoner to Richmond. Fifteen days after, he suffered amputation of his leg; but the result was unsatisfactory, and after long suffering, borne with such patience as is described in the letter of Sister Valentine, the gallant soldier succumbed to his wounds, and, fortified by the consolations of religion, passed to that better world where pain and sorrow are unknown. May his soul rest in peace. Amen.

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Date: Saturday, April 26, 1862

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

March 30, at Denabard House, county Tyrone, John A. Vesey, Esq., eldest son of Samuel Vesey, Esq.

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Date: Saturday, March 21, 1863

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

Feb. 10, at Clifton, Susannah, eldest daughter of the late James Galbraith, Esq., of Omagh, county Tyrone.

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Date: Saturday, August 22, 1863

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

In Sacramento, Cal., on Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1862, of inflammatory dropsy, John Divine, a native of Farmhill, county Tyrone, Ireland, late of New York city, aged 38 years. Irish papers, please copy.

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Date: Saturday, February 11, 1865

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

Died, at his residence, No. 481 Pearl st., New York, on Friday morning, February 3, Mr. James H. O’Neill, aged 34 years.

Mr. O’Neill was born in the county Tyrone, Ireland, in the year 1831. He came to this country at the age of seventeen, and by industry and frugality had secured for himself, at the time of his death, a respectable competence. Of a generous and patriotic nature, he sought, by every method within his reach, to elevate the character, individually and collectively, of all Irishmen with whom he came in contact. The liberation of his native land, and the regeneration of her people, occupied constantly the foremost place in his thoughts. Convince that the vice which followed the intoxicating cup was alike destructive of national and individual greatness, he assiduously labored to reform the fallen, through the benign influence of the Father Mathew and other temperance societies, in this and the neighboring cities. In many of these societies he was a prominent officer and active member, up to the time of his death. In the Fenian Brotherhood, whose cause he espoused with warmth and liberality, he held with honor the position of Centre of the Benburb Circle; and was only prevented from attending the recent Congress at Cincinnati by symptoms of the lung disease, which so abruptly terminated his useful career His funeral, on Sunday last, was attended by the Fenian Brotherhood, the Father Mathew U. B. T. A. R. Society, by the Father Mathew Societies Nos. 2, 3, and 5, and an immense concourse of citizens. While we bow reverently to the divine Will in thus depriving Ireland of a faithful and zealous son, may we not, after so good a life, say – “Oh, grave, where is thy victory? Oh, death, where is thy sting?”

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Date: Saturday, March 25, 1865

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 4

Feb. 21, at Kilmainhamwood House, county Tyrone, Elizabeth, relict of the late Rev. Thomas Forster, aged 82 years.

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Date: Saturday, April 18, 1868

Paper: Irish Citizen (New York, NY) Page: 8

Greene – March 22, at Ballyclog Rectory, county Tyrone, Anna, fourth daughter of the Rev. Henry Greene.

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Date: Saturday, April 25, 1868

Paper: Irish Citizen (New York, NY) Page: 8

Mackay – On the 26th March, at the Crescent, Portstewart, Anne, widow of the late Robert Mackay, Esq., Brookend, county Tyrone, aged 78 years.

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Date: Saturday, July 25, 1868

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 4

June 27, at the residence of her uncle, James Trimble, Esq., Clogher, county Tyrone, Annie, daughter of the late John Trimble, Esq., M D, Castlebellingham.

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Date: Saturday, August 22, 1868

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 3

Died, June 19, at Coal Island, county Tyrone, Ireland, Mr. William McCrystal, well known in his own walk of life for his wise counsels and unflinching straightforwardness, having attained the patriarchal age of 83 years. May his soul rest in peace. Amen.

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Date: Saturday, December 10, 1870

Paper: Irish American Weekly (New York, NY) Page: 5

Death of Father Trainor

Seldom have we been called upon to record the death of any prominent member of the community, whose demise will bring such general sorrow to the hearts of our people as that which it is our duty to chronicle this week. One of the loved pastors of the Irish flock has been called away; - Death has stricken down a shepherd of the fold; and there is a vacant post, - once occupied by a tried soldier of the cross, - which has yet to be filled. On Monday, the 28th ult., the Rev. Thomas Trainor, Pastor of the Church of the Transfiguration, died at the parochial residence, Mott-street, in the 49th year of his age. Father Trainor was a native of the county Tyrone, and came to this county when yet a youth. He was ordained in the Seminary at Fordham; and it is but a just tribute to the memory of the deceased clergyman to say, that, since the demise of the lamented Archbishop Hughes, no similar event has occurred to cause such thorough and heartfelt sorrow in the Diocese of New York. The rev. gentleman had been in the enjoyment of his usual good health up to a week before his decease. But, during the Fair for the Foundling Asylum, in which he took a great interest, he received a heavy wetting, one evening, on his return to his vicarage; and this brought on a serious cold, resulting in pleura-pneumonia, to which after an illness of a week, he succumbed.

The funeral of the rev. gentleman took place on the 1st inst. From the Church of the Transfiguration. The remains had been laid out in the church, on the previous day, before the altar, according to the Catholic ritual; and from an early hour the sacred edifice was filled by the faithful who came to take their last look at their beloved pastor. At 9 o’clock, a.m., on the 1st, a solemn Mass of Requiem was celebrated for the eternal repose of the deceased, the Archbishop and upwards of one hundred clergymen of the Dioceses of New York, Brooklyn and Newark, assisting at the service. The sacred edifice was crowded to its utmost capacity; and hundreds, who could not gain admission, were forced to await the exit of the funeral on the sidewalk. The casket containing the body of the deceased clergyman, which was a very beautiful one of black walnut, handsomely mounted with silver, was placed in the middle aisle, in front of the altar. On the lid was a silver plate with the following inscription:-

Rev. Thomas Trainor, died Nov. 28, 1870,

Aged 49 years.”

The Rev. Father Hassan, of Peekskill, delivered a touching eulogy on the character of the deceased. He reviewed his whole life in the ministry and spoke of his private virtues, in a strain that moved his hearers, - many of whom knew how much the parish owed to the deceased, - to tears of heartfelt regret.

At the conclusion of the services the body of the deceased clergyman was borne to the hearse, and conveyed in solemn procession to St. Patrick’s Cathedral, in the vaults of which it was interred. Upwards of one hundred clergymen marched in the procession, in addition to the boys and girls of the parochial schools, the members of the various Builds, and the Temperance Societies attached to the Church. The cortege was brought up by an immense number of the parishioners, on foot and in carriages, such as has not been seen in a long while May God give eternal rest to the deceased. He was a good priest and a true Irishman.

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